Gardasil gets nod from panel as genital wart Tx in boys, men.(ACROSS SPECIALTIES): An article from: Clinical Psychiatry News05.06.12

Gardasil gets nod from panel as genital wart Tx in boys, men.(ACROSS SPECIALTIES): An article from: Clinical Psychiatry News

 Gardasil gets nod from panel as genital wart Tx in boys, men.(ACROSS SPECIALTIES): An article from: Clinical Psychiatry News

This digital document is an article from Clinical Psychiatry News, published by International Medical News Group on October 1, 2009. The length of the article is 610 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: Gardasil gets nod from panel as genital wart Tx in boys, men.(ACROSS SPECIALTIES)
Author: Elizabeth Me

buynow big Gardasil gets nod from panel as genital wart Tx in boys, men.(ACROSS SPECIALTIES): An article from: Clinical Psychiatry News

List Price: $ 9.95

Price: $ 9.95

Related Genital Warts Products

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Posted in Genital Wartswith No Comments →

HPV and Gardasil11.19.10

CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta reports about HPV and the Gardasil vaccine.
Video Rating: 0 / 5

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
Tags:

Posted in Hpv/with 25 Comments →

Gardasil prevents HPV, genital warts in males.(INFECTIOUS DISEASES)(Clinical report): An article from: Skin & Allergy News11.17.10

Gardasil prevents HPV, genital warts in males.(INFECTIOUS DISEASES)(Clinical report): An article from: Skin & Allergy News

 Gardasil prevents HPV, genital warts in males.(INFECTIOUS DISEASES)(Clinical report): An article from: Skin & Allergy News

This digital document is an article from Skin & Allergy News, published by International Medical News Group on August 1, 2009. The length of the article is 604 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: Gardasil prevents HPV, genital warts in males.(INFECTIOUS DISEASES)(Clinical report)
Author: Miriam E. Tucke

buynow big Gardasil prevents HPV, genital warts in males.(INFECTIOUS DISEASES)(Clinical report): An article from: Skin & Allergy News

List Price: $ 9.95

Price: $ 9.95

Find More Genital Warts Products

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Posted in Genital Wartswith No Comments →

Gardasil: The Hpv Vaccine09.25.10

Gardasil: The Hpv Vaccine

Gardasil: The HPV Vaccine
The vaccine, Gardasil, is a shot given to prevent certain strains of cervical cancer caused by HPV. HPV stands for Human papillomavirus. The vaccine offers protection against the four most common strains of HPV; types 6, 11, 16 and 18. Types 16 and 18 account for 70% of cervical cancers while types 6 and 11 account for 90% of all cases of genital warts. It is given in three shots over a period of six-months. The vaccine is recommended for young girls ages 11 and 12 but is also recommended for girls and women 13 to 26 who have not yet been vaccinated or have not yet completed the series of shots for the vaccine. 
 
This vaccine is important in the saving of women’s and young girls’ lives. Genital HPV is a virus that is most often passed on through sexual contact. Though most will not know it, most sexually active people will get the virus at some point in their life. There is somewhere around 40 strains of HPV that can infect both men and women. Most strains cause no symptoms or harm and go away on their own. There are a few strains that can be deadly and cause cervical cancer in women as well as other genital cancers, while other strains of HPV can cause genital warts in both men and women.
 
It is ideal for females to receive Gardasil before they become sexually active and may be exposed to the virus. However, this is not to say that those who are already sexually active will not benefit from receiving the vaccine. Most females are not infected with all strains of HPV and therefore will still be protected from those types of the virus to which they have not yet been exposed. Both young girls and women do not need to receive a Pap or other tests before receiving Gardasil. Testing is currently underway to find out the effectiveness and safety of the virus on those over the age of 26. It has yet to be found if the vaccine is effective in men or young boys. If Gardasil is found effective, the vaccine may help to prevent genital warts as well as both penile and anal cancer.
 
Gardasil is highly effective in the prevention of HPV. Due to the fact that the vaccine will not fully treat HPV, the vaccine has little effect on the virus in women who have already been exposed to the disease. Research is being done to test how long the vaccine lasts and if there may be a need for a booster shot later down the road for those who are receiving the vaccine. The vaccine is not effective in protecting from all strains of HPV, rather it protects against the most common strains of cervical cancers, so it is very important that women continue their regular checkups and screenings. Gardasil has been approved by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention as effective and safe. Side effects of the shot are typically soreness of the injection site, fever, nausea and dizziness as well as other rare side effects.
 
By contacting your health care provider, you can get information about coverage for the vaccine. Call the phone number on your medical card to learn more about co-pays, co-insurance, deductibles, or other limitations. Most large insurance providers will cover the cost of the vaccine which is about 5 per dose, totaling about 5 for all three shots in the series. Those who are younger than 18 years of age may still be able to get Gardasil for free through the VFC (Vaccines for Children) program, although certain criteria and restrictions may apply. Merck, the maker of the vaccine, offers a vaccine assistance program to women who want to receive Gardasil but cannot afford it. In order to qualify for the program, women must be at least 19 years of age, uninsured, reside in the United States (need not be U.S. citizen), and have an annual income less than ,800 for individuals, ,000 for couples or ,400 for a family of four. Texas, New Hampshire and South Dakota as well as other states have made the cost of the vaccine free or at low cost.
 
Women should continue regular cancer screenings and follow-ups. Pap smears can detect cell changes in the cervix before they turn into cancer. The HPV test can detect HPV on a woman’s cervix, which can be done along with a Pap. There is no cure for HPV so the vaccine is one of the best ways to prevent cervical cancer as well as using protection. The vaccine is not to be used in place of other contraceptive devices. If a person is infected, it may take weeks, months or even years to see signs or symptoms and should be addressed right away. The choice is yours to make. Protect yourself.

http://cancer.about.com/od/cervicalcancer/a/whatishpv_2.htm http://www.cdc.gov/std/Hpv/STDFact-HPV-vaccine.htm
http://www.gardasil.com/hpv/hpv-types/index.html

Find More HPV Articles

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Posted in Hpv/with No Comments →

All About Hpv and Gardasil — a College Girl’s Guide09.20.10

All About Hpv and Gardasil — a College Girl’s Guide

The introduction of the HPV vaccine, Gardasil, has been accompanied by healthy doses of both good and bad news. The good news is that the vaccine’s arrival has brought the virus into the spotlight by giving it the press it deserves. But the bad news is that myths and misconceptions about the virus and the vaccine abound, and these can and have caused considerable harm. For example, one prevalent myth is that promiscuity is the main reason why people get HPV infections. The fact is, it’s possible to get an HPV infection even from a monogamous relationship. Here are some more common questions about HPV, the vaccine, and how they can affect teens’ lives.

The Facts of HPV:

So what is HPV, really?

HPV is the human papilloma virus. It is the most common sexually transmitted virus. It isn’t the same as HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) or HSV (Herpes Simplex Virus), and it’s not a new virus — it’s just often overlooked in discussions of common sexually transmitted diseases. There are more than a 100 types of HPV that can cause a variety of diseases, but we’ll focus on its most significant manifestation — genital HPV. Sexual contact is the most common way to transmit genital HPV, including not only sexual intercourse, but also sexual contact without intercourse and oral sex. HPV is a silent infection, meaning that many people are unaware that they are infected and can transmit the virus to their sexual partners without even knowing.

Who gets HPV?

Anyone can get HPV infections. It is estimated that at least 50 percent of sexually active men and women will acquire a genital HPV infection at some point in their lives.  Most infections clear up on their own without any medical treatment in 12-24 months. People at the highest risk of getting HPV infections are those who engage in high-risk sexual behavior such as having multiple partners, having unprotected sex, and starting to have sex at an early age. Also, having a weak immune system due to poor nutrition, stress, and smoking can make existing HPV infections persist in the body for a longer period of time and cause HPV-related diseases.

Many of my patients have asked me if two people in a monogamous relationship can get HPV. The short answer is, unfortunately, yes. Even if you are currently in a monogamous relationship, you or your partner could have acquired HPV from a previous sexual relationship; the disease can lie dormant in the body for many years and can become active at any time. The only way to prevent HPV is for both partners in a monogamous relationship to have never had prior sexual partners or to abstain from sexual contact altogether.

What are the consequences of having HPV?

There are three possible results of HPV infection. First, it is possible to become a carrier of HPV and never show symptoms for the rest of your life. Second, you could develop genital warts, which are irritating, visually unpleasant, embarrassing, and often require repeated treatments to get rid of them. Third, you could develop a HPV related cancer, the most serious of which is cervical cancer.  In addition, HPV can be a cause for tremendous emotional issues, such as feelings of guilt, blame and shame.

Should you get the vaccine?

There are now two vaccines available to prevent most HPV related diseases. Only one, Gardasil, is currently available in the United States. The vaccine is preventative in nature, meaning it can only prevent and not treat existing HPV infections. The vaccine protects against four different types of HPV, two of which cause 70% of cervical cancers, and the other two which cause most genital warts.

The CDC recommends the vaccine for girls at ages 11-12 years for maximum benefit. However, if you didn’t receive the vaccine at this age, you can still get it up until the age of 26, even if you are sexually active. This is because even if you have already been exposed to some types of HPV, the vaccine will still prevent against any of the four types that you haven’t. It is important to note that the vaccine does not prevent against pregnancy or other sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV/AIDS, Chlamydia or Gonorrhea. Therefore, it’s crucial to continue to be abstinent or practice safer sex even after receiving the vaccine.

Should you get the Pap test?

A Pap test (also called a Pap smear) detects abnormal cell changes in the cervix, some of which if not treated, can progress to cancer.  Therefore, once the abnormal changes are detected, they sometimes require close follow-ups and uncomfortable procedures. Pap tests, no doubt, have dramatically reduced the rates of cervical cancer in this country.  But the vaccine, on the other hand, prevents these abnormal changes from occurring in the first place. Obviously, prevention is preferable to detection and treatment. But as the vaccine only protects against 70 percent of cervical cancer, it’s important to keep getting Pap tests to detect the other 30 percent. Consult your health care provider to find out when you should start getting Pap tests.

What are the ways to prevent and fight HPV infections?

There are some basic tips to follow to keep healthy and avoid HPV infections.

Follow the “ABCDE” rules of prevention:  Abstinence, Being monogamous, Consistent condom use, Delayed sexual activity and Education.

Avoid drugs and excessive alcohol: These activities can lead to risky sexual behavior that make getting HPV more likely.

Get vaccinated: Getting the Gardasil vaccine before you become sexually active can protect you from HPV strains that cause 90% of genital warts and 70% of cervical cancers. If you are already sexually active and haven’t been vaccinated, you should still consider getting vaccinated, as this can protect you from the vaccine strains that you may not have been exposed to.

Boost your immune system:

·       Quit smoking:  Smoking weakens your immune system and makes HPV hang around longer in your body which can then cause disease.

·       Reduce stress: Look into techniques such as exercise that help you relax and make you feel good about yourself.

·       Eat healthy:  Add foods rich in Vitamins C and E such as fruits and vegetables that have cancer-fighting properties to your diet.  In addition, it’s a good idea to take a multivitamin daily.

HPV can be a potentially serious and chronic disease that can have tremendous medical, psychological and sexual consequences. It can turn your life upside down overnight.  One chance encounter is all it takes to be potentially infected by the HPV virus. By seeking accurate information and taking productive steps, you can prevent the spread of HPV. Knowledge and education about HPV infections will help contain the spread of infection — ignorance will not.

©2008 Shobha S. Krishnan, M.D.

Author Bio
Shobha S. Krishnan, M.D., is a board certified gynecologist and family practice physician at Barnard College, Columbia University. Her new book, “The HPV Vaccine Controversy: Sex, Cancer, God and Politics: A Guide to parents, women, men and teenagers” was published on August 30, 2008, by Greenwood Publications. The book presents the most up to date information about the vaccine without the influence of pharmaceutical companies or other interest groups.

Visit http://www.greenwood.com/catalog/C35011.aspxfor more information. The book can also be purchased at Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble.com and Borders.com.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks

Posted in Hpv/with No Comments →

  • You Avatar